Queen of Sheeba

If you are an orchid lover like me you will know how that name gets the heart beating and the pulse racing. The Queen of Sheeba is one very rare and very beautiful lady.

I could add it here, but where’s the fun in that…

we were traveling and asking all we passed if they had seen any orchids, after two days at one camp someone let us know they had found the Queen..

Excitement plus as we raced to get instructions, pack up camp and head out, she never hangs around very long.

Later that day after arriving at our destination and not finding her we cast the net a bit wider and started a serious search and the shout went up…..we had found her!!!

Okay enough? Here she is….

Northern Queen of Sheeba

Terrestail orchid western Australia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Was it worth the wait! It was for us. We took lots of photos, side on, top view, leaf, back view and more. This is the photo tip, when you get presented with once in a life time opportunities take as many images as you can, if you have a chance, walk away, have a look at the images, check you have what you want, if not go and take some more, even if you have, check all your settings and then take some more. You can always delete some you may never get the chance to take it again.

Northern Queen of Sheeba leaf

curly leaf

back of northern Queen of Sheeba

back of orchid

Northern Queen of Sheeba

Terrestial orchid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you enjoyed meeting this lady as much as I did. By next week I will have many more wildflowers to share with you as we are now back in Perth and I have some time and some internet!!!

Wreath Flowers

I have always wanted to see  real wreath flower. I had seen pictures, but I wanted to see one for myself.  Wreath flowers are a unique and  beautiful Western Australia wildflower. They grow in expanding circles, with the flowers appearing around the edges forming a living wreath. They bloom a vivid deep pink and white, some are mainly white and a dusty pink, some are vibrant red. Flower fanatics come from everywhere to see these beauties for themselves. The plants grow on disturbed ground, so recently graded roads are a great place to see them. They only grow in certain locations and at certain times of the year, generally between late August and November, depending on rainfall. There is a section of the mid west of WA where they grow. We found some a tPerenjori, Morowa and the Morowa to Yalgoo Road. If you go to the local tourist information they will tell you the best places to go.

Their botanical name is Lechenaultia macrantha. Lechenaultia macrantha is placed in the family Goodeniaceae, nearly all of which are found in Australia’s arid regions.

Okay, I’ve kept you in suspense long enough…..here they are

first wreath flower

Lechenaultia macrantha is a species of low growing plant found on sandy or gravelly soils in Western Australia.

weath flowers

Two wreath flowers up on the bank of a gravel pit

wreath flower 2

This is how they start growing

wreath flower 4

A pink and white wreath flower

wreath flower 5

Dark pink and white wreath flower

wreath flower close up

Close up of the flowers of Lechenaultia macrantha

wreath flower hunting

Looking for flowers

wreath flower pink 6

A beautiful example of a wreath flower

wreath flowers 2

These wreaths love to grow around other trees

Travelling in the Outback

We are travelling from Broome to Coral Bay and will be stopping in Exmouth on the way, so I thought I would include some of the iconic wildflower of Western Australia, the Sturt Desert Pea. This wildflower is a vivid red with a black center and adds dramatic colour to the landscape. I will add more wildflowers as we travel further through the area, but here is a taste to wet your appetite.

sturt desert pea 3

An iconic western australian wildflower

sturt desert Pea 1

Sturt pea in the australian outback

sturt desert pea 6

A cluster of peas on a bush

sturt desurt pea 2

Close up of sturt pea

Early strut pea

This is a sturt desert pea waiting to open into full flower

sturt pea top view

Looking at the Sturt Pea from above