Inspiration

Most of you know of my orchid images and love seeing them so I will add some at the end of the post as this is what this is all about.

As most of you would know from my absence that inspiration and motivation have been sadly lacking in my life since my hubby, Colin, passed away. Yes I am living, doing new things and trying to move on, but sadly inspiration and motivation have been a long way away, so what has inspired and motivated me to do this blog post?

Well a combination of two things, one a very inspirational person and two, injustice.

First let me tell you about this person who has inspired me.

He, yes it’s a good Aussie bloke, is a person who has a great love of native orchids and wildflowers in general. He has a wealth of knowledge and has found orchids that had never been photographed before as well as many new sites for some that were thought to be extinct or very close to extinction.

Now this in itself is pretty amazing, but this person doesn’t get paid for what he does, he heads out almost every day no matter what the weather and often on his own, to fight the mosquitoes, snakes and tics to survey new areas.

He could rely on what others have found, but no, he ventures out to new locations, exploring, sometimes finding very little and sometimes being greatly rewarded with a rare find.

Does this man keep the information to himself or write a book to profit from the knowledge he has gained?

No, he freely shares it with people in his Facebook Group, called “Western Australian Native Orchids.”

He has inspired a new generation of people to learn about our native orchids, to walk the bush carefully, looking where they walk, taking care when photographing so as not to disturb habitat.

He has discovered things that affect the orchids which no one previously knew.

Such as, that some of the methods of marking orchids for surveying were harming the plants and as a result, new methods have been found.

He has liaisoned with councils and raised awareness to stop habitat loss which is the greatest cause of orchids becoming endangered.

He has discovered that even using a flash can change the percentage of some flowers being pollinated.

He has shared this information freely and shown people to many sites, teaching them how to ensure we don’t harm the orchids.

Has the orchid community at large appreciated this?

Some have, but he has also been the target of much jealousy and people who want to make money doing what he does, harassing him and others in his group.

This in itself would be a great injustice, but on top of everything else his youngest son died this year, less that 3 months ago.

He has continued to be there for others as he quietly deals with his pain and grief and yet this is when some people choose to put the boots in.

What is wrong with the human race that we attack our own kind?

We see it constantly, people who give and care being attacked or vilified by others in the industry.

I would encourage each of you to think about the things you fight against and see if there is another way, can you educate people, rather than trying to control them.

Can you instill love rather than hate?

Can you be an example to others?

Terry Dunham is the man that has inspired me to write this post and I want to thank him for all the work he has done, in running the FB group, in opening up the wonderful world of native orchids to us, for giving his time and knowledge freely. For choosing to educate us, so that we too can educate our friends and the next generation, it is only as we learn to know what is around us that we will be able to preserve it.

Now I would like you to enjoy the following images.

such amazing detail

close up of the leafless orchid, aren’t the colors beautiful

Helmet Orchid

This is the tiny helmet orchid, it is about the size of a pinky fingernail and grows in moist damp areas close to the ground or in rotting tree stumps.

Tozers Bush Camp

Queen of Sheeba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hare orchid

Hare Orchid. I left the finger in to show you the size.

Blue lady a sun orchid

Orchid Season is here

Let the treasure hunt begin….

 For those of you who have been following my photography for a while you will know how much I enjoy going out looking for the tiny terrestrial orchids that grow in Australia.Well it’s that time again and here are a few we have found so far.
Common Bunny orchid

There are quite a few different bunny orchids, so the search was on to find as many as possible, This is just one of them, a common bunny

Hare orchid

Hare Orchid. I left the finger in to show you the size.

Leporella

Another shot of a hare, they really do look like a hare pooping up

Praecoxanthus

Leafless Orchid.
This shows you a close up and the environment they are found in.

such amazing detail

close up of the leafless orchid, aren’t the colors beautiful

Cyrtostylis huegelii

This is a midge orchid, it looks like little midges attaching the stem.

Helmet Orchid

This is the tiny helmet orchid, it is about the size of a pinky fingernail and grows in moist damp areas close to the ground or in rotting tree stumps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is just a few to wet your appetite, I will upload more as time permits, between searching and sleeping:))

Swamp Spider Orchid, Caladenia paludosa

This is an orchid that is found in winter wet areas and this one we found in the Busselton area around Ruabon Rd.

It was a rainy day so we had to dodge showers but it enabled us to get them with raindrops and water on them.

swamp spider orchid

view from above

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When photographing any flower you should try to get as many angles as possible especially if you will be using the photos to identify the plant.

 

Caladenia Paludosa

Swamp spider orchid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Often the only differentiating features on an orchid will be the height of the fringe or the clubs on its petals so be sure to include these.

Caladenia paludosa

Full plant including leaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes it is the leaf that helps in the identification and it also helps us find them as the leaves come out first and then the flower, So it always pays to know what leaf you are looking for.

Caladenia paludosa

Side view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Often getting the whole flower in focus is hard, so if we shoot side on we get the most of the depth of field.

Orchids are often very small so please watch where you put your feet when you are walking in the bush and make sure you have pest repellent, water, a hat and wear sunscreen.

Happy hunting.

Do you love taking photos?

Truck in the dust at sunset

Do you wish you could take better photos or were motivated to take more?

I have good news for you and it’s not going to cost you a cent!!!

Yep totally free.

I am going to be posting tips, tricks, walkthroughs and more to help you when taking the image and when processing it.

If you are subscribed to my newsletter you will receive a link to any articles I have put up during the week. If you want to have your finger on the pulse, bookmark the site and check each day.

Depending on my health as to how often I post.

Now we get to the best part. It’s orchid season. For those of us in Australia anyway. I like in an area in the south west of Western Australia and we have some of the best wildflowers at this time of the year, including many orchids.

I am going to start off with a teaser…..

Thelymitra variegata

This is the rare and endangered Thelymitra variegata

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the rare and endangered, “Queen of Sheba” or Thelymitra variegata

It grows in Banksia woodlands in the scrub areas around the coastal areas of South West Australia.

For most of the orchids I will give you a general idea of where to look for them unless they are endangered, as is this one. I will tell you though, that each year, they have tours in the Stirling Rangers where they will take you to see them. They have finished for this year, but we are planning on heading down there next year.

We will do a bit of travelling and sometimes I will get information from other people. I want to add here a very important note. Many people are not sharing locations anymore as people are digging up the plants. The plants need certain fungi and certain trees around them to grow and they need there specific pollinators to  be pollinated and reproduce, so digging them up is a waste of time, it is also illegal as is picking of all wildflowers in Australia and carries with it a hefty fine.

Take you camera or your phone and take pictures but leave the plants for others to enjoy.A lot of these orchids are very tiny, ranging from the size of a match head to the size of a small daisy, so when going through any bush watch where you put your feet.

Another important thing we have learn’t through our own journey, I have been hunting and photographing orchids for the last 6 years, is that whatever grows in the bush also grows by the paths or tracks. Often you will find them on the path and if you go into the bush looking for them you won’t find any more, so most often look along the road verges, follow tracks or paths and you will find them. Even the Queen we found 3 foot off the path and easily spotted from the path. (After I had spent 3 different days looking through the bush, thinking it wouldn’t be near a path!) So learn from our experiences.

The other reason to stay on the path or road is there is less chance of getting ticks. Ticks love the Western Australian bush and if you go bush bashing I can guarantee you will get a few. They are not nice and carry some nasty diseases, so look after yourself and the environment at the same time.

I will end this post here as I want to pin this to the front so any new people to the site can read it, but I will add another post giving you an idea of what is out now and where to look.

Learn how to Photograph Flowers and/or Night Photography

Macro either excites people or terrifies them.

Flowers are a favourite starting point for many people wanting to get into macro photography, for two reasons. One is that they are readily available and two there are lots that aren’t really small.

Pink everlastings 2

A blue/purple wildflower in the bush

 

 

 

 

 

 

For others it is their love of gardening that draws them to photography and eventually macro as they want to record the changes that happen in their garden.

Flowers are favourites for photographers as well. They have a great range of colour and form and they tap into our memories, so they help us to express an emotion or tell a story.

The June Photography Dash is on Flowers and/or night photography, so it is a great way to start your journey into macro photography or unleash your creativity in light painting.

sturt desurt pea 2

Close up of sturt pea

sturt pea top view

Symetry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn how framing, angles and depth of field all influence how the image will look. Learn what lighting to use, learn when the best time to take flower photography is.

spider orchid Mt lesueur

An exotic spider orchid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can learn how to take wonderful photos that show your flowers off in their best light.

The other stream of the Dash for June is Night Photography, so join one or both Dashes and take your photography to the next level.

After you have signed up to the Dash you will get an email asking you if you want to upgrade to Gold.

You don’t have to, to learn, but this is an amazing opportunity.

For less than a cup of coffee a day you can have a professional photographer as your coach. They will look at your images, tell you what you have done right and what you can improve, but better than that they will tell you HOW to get it right.

This is an interactive course where you can learn in a unique environment. Take this opportunity today, it is one that most people would not be able to afford if they had to hire a professional photographer direct, but that has been made affordable through being part of the Dash.

Dashers also form a great community of like minded people. Many participants have gone on to form lasting friendships, both with other participants and with the professional coaches. Are you serious about your photography? Click on the link now.

Not into flowers, but want to get creative with Night Photography? We have you covered too.

The two Dashes run simultaneously, You can do one or both.

In the Night photography stream you will learn what gear to use, what settings work best, how to have fun with light painting and much more.

orb try 1 earth, moon & sun align

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You too can take amazing photos, don’t hesitate, take the plunge now.

There is another lunar eclipse happening soon, prepare now so you will know how to when the moment arrives.

It doesn’t matter if you are a beginner or a semi-pro this course will help you take your images to the next level. Be part of The Photography Dash now!

Wildflower Country

We have had a week of travelling the wildflower way in Western Australia’s mid north and have had a ball and seen lots of beautiful flowers.

We have seen many traditional and well known wildflowers, but also some tiny and elusive orchids. I love hunting for terrestrial orchids, it feels like a great treasure hunt that is sometimes very rewarding and sometimes very disappointing.

This area of Western Australia is one of the most diverse wildflower areas in the world.

Lets go have a look…

ant orchid

Caladenia roei
Ant Orchid, Clown Orchid
Northern form

Antelope Orchid

Dancing spider orchid or antelope orchid, both names are used

Caladenia xantha Primrose orchid 1

Primrose Orchid

common spider orchid

common spider orchid

common spider orchid

common spider orchid, Caladenia vulgata

common spider orchids

Caladenia vulgata, common spider orchids

Daddy Long legs spider orchid Caladenia longicauda subsp borealis

Daddy Long legs spider orchid,
Caladenia longicauda subsp borealis

feild of spider orchids

Another field of orchids

Caladenia xantha Primrose Spider Orchid

Caladenia xantha
Primrose Spider Orchid

primrose orchid

This shows the size of a primrose orchid

spoon lipped rufous greenhood pterostylis spathulata

this shows sign of Ruffous orchid

spoonlipped Rufous Greenhead pterostylis spathulata

close up of spoonlipped Rufous Greenhead pterostylis spathulata